Do you feel like you’re coming short on time with managing your small business? You may not be able to drop some of your tasks, but what you can do is to effectively manage your time to create some room for other work. Small business owners often find their selves juggling between one task from the other with only a couple of minutes to take a breather. From meeting project deadlines and negotiating with clients to keeping track of operating expenses and answering customer inquiries, small business owners certainly have a lot on their plates. This is why time management is paramount to their lives.

Fortunately, time management is something you can learn and does not require much brain works. So if you think that you’re constantly on the move whatever time of the day and feel like you don’t have enough time at all, then these three tips may help you manage your time smartly and effectively.

  1. Plan beforehand

Start organizing your workload and work your way up. You can do much work when your workspace or workload us in turmoil. Establish work goals whether these are small or large in order to keep yourself and your business on the right track that you want to be. You can begin by writing down at least five realistic goals for the week. Create them with details on what to do and how to do them then start ticking one each day. A time-tracking app may also help you in keeping track of how much time you spend on a certain project.

  1. Adapt to apps

Use your smartphone to as one of your primary business tool. Take advantage of the plenty benefits of apps designed to make your life easier by managing your work schedule and workflow. If the old-school to-do-lists are no longer working for you, then you can try Wunderlist, an app that lets you set reminders, prioritize your tasks, and share you to-do-list with other people. It can also be accessed through your laptop and desktop computer. For a detailed project management, you can use Trello to supervise your small business’ overall workflow. Using this app, you can build a board for each project, input the procedures needed, and send them through.

  1. Know when to turn over some work

Most often, during the early stages of your business, you take on everything that has to do with your business even if it means you leave no room for breaks. So by now, you have probably picked up some useful skills and are now pretty good at these tasks. However, as your business grows, your time as the business owners become even more precious. This is the time when you have to delegate some of your works. It could mean outsourcing or simply passing some tasks to your employees.

First off, determine what tasks you least like. If you can decide on the things that you usually procrastinate on because you don’t like them, then you can think of someone else that can do a better job than you. You can have your staff do it or you can hire freelancers or contractors specializing in certain skills.